the sudden stillness of deep interconnectedness

Given that the editor of this site is indebted for much of her understanding of the dynamics of creativity to a noted physicist – David Bohm – it’s an unbounded delight to welcome a physicist with a passion for photography to the artisans’ gallery.

Andy Ilachinski‘s eye ranges over a vast and varied array of phenomena – he tends to leave his photographs untitled, preferring to group them instead into portfolios with titles such as Tao, Micro Worlds, Abstract Glyphs, Mystic Flame, Ice Abstracts, Synesthscapes, and various geographical locations.

On his page, he shares with poetic nuance the way his knowledge and understanding of the micro-universe informs his practice of photography, ultimately delivering him into “deep interconnectedness”.

 

Andy Ilachinski - Micro Worlds portfolio

 

I am, by training and profession, a physicist, specializing in the modeling of complex adaptive systems (with a Ph.D. in theoretical physics). However, both by temperament and inner muse, I am a photographer, and have been one for far longer than my Ph.D. gives me any right to claim an ownership by physics. Photography became a life-long pursuit for me the instant my parents gave me a Polaroid instamatic camera for my 10th birthday. I have been studying the mysterious relationship between inner experiences and outer realities ever since.

– Andy Ilachinski

… continue reading at Andy’s page


Other photographers featured at the artisans’ gallery:

john daido loori
dan dhruva baumbach
karen divine
roy money
dennis cordell
mitchell doshin cantor
lisa gakyo schaewe
ron rosenstock


I’ve lost track of which is which

 

Nina Papiorek: Namibia Zebras iii

 

Zebras: July 22

When I look at this photograph of zebras, when I feel love for them, I become them: I enter their stripes, feel their taut flesh, their muscled bodies, the flanks, the legs, the soft nostrils.

I cannot hold myself apart from them long enough to experience it as love of other. When I love one of these zebras, I am reveling in my own delineated skin, my four points of contact with the earth, the tail of long hair soft at the backs of my behind legs.

Who made this animal? And why? Why on earth – why in a whole universe – such whimsy? What got into somebody’s head, to mark me thus?

When one zebra looks at another, it is not amazed at what it sees. Probably the looker little supposes that it looks much the stripy same as the other fellow. But even if it knew about its own appearance, this knowledge would not impress the zebra.

I can feel the other zebra’s head resting in the middle of my back, where its undermouth sinks into the curve of my spine. Its weight is deeply satisfying. And I can feel the weight of my own chin sunk heavily into the other zebra’s welcoming back, and holding the weight of my striped head (though I do not know that it is striped). I can smell the other, and the other can smell me. I’ve lost track of which is which.

Don’t try to figure it out. It isn’t important. Nor is it worth any effort at all to tell where zebra stops and human starts.

– Jan Frazier
When Fear Falls Away: The Story of a Sudden Awakening


[I have no way of knowing what picture Jan was looking at when she wrote this piece; the image here is by photographer Nina Papiorek]


a path to stillness and awakening

New at the artisans’ gallery – photographer Dan Dhruva Baumbach

For Dan, art  – and art appreciation – is a path to stillness and awakening.

These days I love to spend my time in nature wandering around with my camera.  I still get very quiet and just respond to the beauty I see in front of me.  Sometimes I’ll take photographs of what I am seeing and sometimes not.

 

Photograph by Dan Dhruva Baumbach

 

What I’m doing in photographs is capturing my experience.  If you look at my photos and are stopped, then I’ve been successful.

People like to talk about spiritual art but I don’t like to make differences.  To me the purpose of any art is to stop you and take you out of yourself.

– Dan Dhruva Baumbach


website

blog

iPhone apps


Dan Dhruva Baumbach at the artisans’ gallery


related:

let your subject find you

wherever the eye falls is the face of creation


the realization of not-two-ness

 

It is [the] flash of realization of not-two-ness, that is both the centre and the endpoint of our human experience.

In every seed of every weed, in the knee-joint of a dead wasp’s leg, the structure of the Whole of Reality is laid bare for those who have eyes to see.

 

Image by Laurent Schwebel

 

Our brain filters out the overwhelming poignancy of this Structure of Reality, of the Divine, as it manifests in all that is.

The eye, however, when it awakens, sees all things as “unseparated” from itself, to speak with Eckhart*.

– Frederick Franck
The Awakened Eye


* Meister Eckhart: The eye with which I see God is the eye with which God sees me.

Photograph: Laurent Schwebel


Frederick Franck at the artisans’ gallery

seeing/drawing as meditation

the Face of faces

the 10 commandments
(Frederick Franck’s guidelines for the creative life)


wherever the eye falls is the face of creation

New at the artisans’ gallery – photographer Mitchell Doshin Cantor

Mitchell, who is also a Zen teacher and member of the White Plum Asanga, currently leads the Southern Palm Zen Group in Boca Raton, Florida. He is also a long time student of Peter Matthiessen.

 

Wherever the eye falls
is the face of creation.
– Sufi saying

 

The study, practice, and teaching of Zen have contributed as much to my photography as has any practical instruction. Fortunately, photographers who were technically rich as well as spiritual masters have guided me. I have received great benefit from their teachings. I now wish to share my photographs so that others can be enthused to trust life and its voices, audible and inaudible, in ways that these teachers have helped open for me.

 

Mitchell Doshin Cantor: Bridgewood Buds

Bridgewood Buds

 

There is … no need to ask what the image means nor why or how it was taken. For me it is enough to relax into the power of the moment the shutter is pressed or the printer is activated; to have no fear of trusting the truth of that moment.

– Mitchell Doshin Cantor

listeningwiththeeye.com


Mitchell Doshin Cantor at the artisans’ gallery


related posts:

everything is this Knowing

the radiance of things as they are

water seeing water